Olympian water diversions

Interesting piece on the Forbes website detailing the huge amounts of water being taken from Chinese farmers by the central government to provide for the Beijing Olympics.  (found thru James5)

Please like & share:

4 Comments

  1. Hmmm. Putting on the global sporting event actually causes some pain?

    I figure that the 2000 Sydney Olympics (with rubbery costing somwhere between two & seven billion dollars) may have touched some “working families” as well.

    So does a government do what’s best for one, or what’s best for the community at large. Do what’s best for bugs & shrubs (Gaia) or what’s best for mankind?

    I’m not taking any position on Chinese resource management here (though do note that some compensation was paid to affected land owners/users), just saying that a simplistic religious green viewpoint may be characteristically ignoring the issues at hand.

  2. The Chinese government will never impress me, no matter what it does.

    I wouldn’t call sticking up for farmers losing their livelihood a simplistic religious green viewpoint. It could be a matter of life and death.

    From my point of view, the Olympic Games has become an outrageously expensive, colossal farce.

    The widespread use of anabolic steroids is a case in point. Any pretence of fair competition went out the window a long time ago.

  3. Lorikeet, a “simplistic religious green viewpoint” would be to stick up for the farmers with total disregard for the bigger picture.

    The corollary would be a simplistic pro Olympics/sport “anything goes” position in favour of the event – and who cares about anyone in the road to progress.

    I didn’t, and wouldn’t condone either stance.

    Surely, there will be some good outcomes from the Olympics, but like many things in life, is the gain worth the pain?

  4. While I’m loathe to criticise sporting events like the Olympics that at least have the aim of bring people together in the spirit of peace and harmony, it seems the Olympics have long become commercialised and politicised.

    Nevertheless – and despite my dislike of Chinese government policies – I will inevitably still watch some of it, probably because I enjoy seeing people strive to do better. And also because I’m an Aussie who loves sport.

Comments are closed.