Helping Iranians to speak, hear and be heard

The crucial role the internet is playing in enabling Iranians (and the rest of the world) to access uncensored information about what is happening in the post-election dispute http://blogs.crikey.com.au/bartlett/2009/06/17/the-revolution-will-be-twittered/ has been well documented.  It is obvious that social media tools like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and blogs are very important, otherwise the Iranian government would not be putting so much effort into trying to prevent online access.
Avaaz.org often uses online petitions to build momentum on any issue – a method which I’m sometime not overly convinced is very effective. But their https://secure.avaaz.org/en/iran_break_the_blackout
current campaign encouraging donations to assist those inside Iran to obtain online access looks like a very worthwhile and practical one.  The current brutality of the Iranian government might be fading from the headlines a bit, but it is certainly still occurring.
Avaaz’s site outlines why this is in important:
We urgently need to help Iranians get back on the internet to have their voices heard in Iran and the world. Secure and anonymous “proxy services” are helping people to bypass regime controls and get online — but they’re overloaded and running out of funds. A small donation can provide bandwidth for hundreds of secure emails.
Proxy services provide people with a single link at which they can freely access the internet. The link is changed every time the regime blocks access to it. With 10,000 donors, we can scale up the proxy services massively — providing more servers, bandwidth and advanced technical support.
https://secure.avaaz.org/en/iran_break_the_blackout Click here to find out more.

The crucial role the internet is playing in enabling Iranians (and the rest of the world) to access uncensored information about what is happening in the post-election dispute has been well documented.  It is obvious that social media tools like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and blogs are very important, otherwise the Iranian government would not be putting so much effort into trying to prevent online access.

Avaaz.org often uses online petitions to build momentum on any issue – a method which I’m sometimes not overly convinced is very effective. But their current campaign encouraging donations to assist those inside Iran to obtain online access looks like a very worthwhile and practical one.  The current brutality of the Iranian government might be fading from the headlines a bit, but it is certainly still occurring.

Avaaz’s site outlines why this is in important:

We urgently need to help Iranians get back on the internet to have their voices heard in Iran and the world. Secure and anonymous “proxy services” are helping people to bypass regime controls and get online — but they’re overloaded and running out of funds. A small donation can provide bandwidth for hundreds of secure emails.

Proxy services provide people with a single link at which they can freely access the internet. The link is changed every time the regime blocks access to it. With 10,000 donors, we can scale up the proxy services massively — providing more servers, bandwidth and advanced technical support.

Click here to find out more.

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3 Comments

  1. While I’m not defending Iran or its leadership in any way, and I certainly abhor the execution of young 16 yr old women on so-called immoral charges, when she was the one taken advantage of, raped while in prison, and then ILLEGALLY executed.(I abhor capital punishment, anywhere)but in Iran, children are NOT to be executed? However, I think the media is very selective re the issues/human rights etc they take up. Burma has a horrific regime, and yet Australia(as far as I know) is still training its military? Indonesia has a history of murderous activity via the military and the police – we’re still providing aid for training etc?

    We quite rightly protest over Zimbabwe but conveniently ignore the other African countries, where the despotic leadership is condoned by the US, and therefore, us! We didn’t protest re the 2000 and probably 2004 presidential election in the US(watch How Bush Won Florida). We didn’t protest over the hundreds maybe thousands of people in the Us of middle eastern appearance(Unconstitutional-the death of civil liberties in the US), or what happened to the people of Diego Garcia, or El Salvador, Chile, and where’s the outrage over Honduras?

    If we want to show moral outrage, then we should be consistent. Why are we still in Iraq, and killing innocents in Afghanistan? As I’ve said before, the hypocrisy is sickening! There are people and un-people!Of course, there’s always those in Palestine – scores of UN resolutions that have been ignored by Israel for 50 yrs and not one word from the West castigating Israel for non-compliance! Hypocrisy is alive and well, we have a very selective view of democracy and human rights? The others don’t matter!

  2. Yes, the way women and children are being treated in Iran is disgusting.

    But even here in Australia, I think respect for women is going backwards. When a man is given only 12 months in jail for the manslaughter of his new bride, what is the message being given to men?

    When convicted serial paedophiles are released back into the community, how much consideration is being given to the welfare of children?

    Howard shelled out millions in a TV campaign telling men that women were not here to be bashed, but then he introduced Welfare to Work, devaluing women as mothers, and children as people in need of emotional support. He also hurt women and children through changes to the Child Support Agency and the Family Court.

    We ladies need to get tough!

  3. Yes LORIKEET I agree. There were so many contradictions with Howard. On the one hand, the ‘family is everything’ nonsense, and as you point out, women who are mothers were treated appallingly by the policies of getting women back to work, or I should say, forcing women to work once their youngest turned 6 or 8? The tax policies penalised families where women worked more than 20% compared to the male.

    Sadly, the attitude to women around the world has always been pretty awful – look at wars, incomes for women raising kids alone etc, and of course the streets have never been safe for women – day or night! A woman is murdered in this country every 10 days, and who knows how many kids are too. The stats don’t give a clear picture, because many of these homicides don’t come out in the stats – DV and the protection of using childrens’ names etc. Only in recent times have some States made the decision to research all homicides of women, where the perpetrator was an intimate family member – husband/partner? I’m constantly amazed that these govts had to be pushed into the sensible and rational position of trying to find out why – and if they had documented past calls by the woman for protection – how many and why didn’t they take her seriously??Sadly, AVO’s don’t save these women’s lives.

    There’s an item on the SMH website today, where a man’s sentence for shooting his sister more than a dozen times was halved – she’d been raped and he justified his crime by saying it was an “honour killing”? The parliament of that country doesn’t intend changing the laws re these types of killings. There’s almost 20 of these each year in this middle eastern country? Not one word re trying to catch the bastard who raped her? Obviously, her “honour” doesn’t count?
    We have a long way to go!

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