First candidate forum for Brisbane

The contest for the House of Reps seat of Brisbane at this year’s federal election will almost certainly be the only one which features 3 competing candidates each with over 10 years of experience in the federal Parliament.
Those 3 candidates are:
Arch Bevis, who has held the seat on behalf of the Labor Party since 1990;
Teresa Gambaro from the Liberal National Party, who held the seat of Petrie from 1996 until 2007  and
Andrew Bartlett (that’s me), running for the Greens. I represented Queensland in the Senate from 1997 – 2008.
One benefit of having three experienced candidates all endorsed and announced well in advance of the election is the chance for candidate forums to be organised well in advance.  Trying to arrange these forums and coordinate the availability of candidates in the hectic few weeks after the election has been announced is very difficult.
The three of us are appearing on Wednesday April 28th at a Make Poverty History candidate forum organised by Oxfam.  It will be go from 6.30-8.30pm, at the Gehrmann Theatre at the Brisbane Girls’ Grammar School on Gregory Terrace.

The contest for the House of Reps seat of Brisbane at this year’s federal election will almost certainly be the only one which features 3 competing candidates who each have over 10 years of experience in the federal Parliament.

Those 3 candidates are:

Arch Bevis, who has held the seat on behalf of the Labor Party since 1990;

Teresa Gambaro from the Liberal National Party, who held the seat of Petrie from 1996 until 2007  and

Andrew Bartlett (on the off chance you weren’t aware, that’s me), running for the Greens. I represented Queensland in the Senate from 1997 – 2008.

One benefit of having three experienced candidates all endorsed and announced well in advance of the election is the chance for candidate forums to be organised well in advance. Trying to arrange these forums and coordinate the availability of candidates in the hectic few weeks after the election has been announced is very difficult.

The three of us are appearing on Wednesday April 28th at a Make Poverty History candidate forum organised by Oxfam.  It will be go from 6.30-8.30pm, at the Gehrmann Theatre at the Brisbane Girls’ Grammar School on Gregory Terrace.

(UPDATE 16/4:  This forum has now been postponed – it has been rescheduled to a date to be fixed.)

Please like & share:

34 Comments

  1. Nice to see you standing for the Greens Andrew. Who knows, you might bring a bit of Democrat reasonableness to their behaviour. I miss the Democrats and their ability to improve governments by buffing off their worst excesses in the Senate.

  2. Kat

    I wrote about that at this post of mine a few months ago:

    http://andrewbartlett.com/?p=7325

    But in short, the Democrats no longer really exist as a viable political organisation (as was shown once more in the recent SA election). Certainly in Queensland the party wound up its incorporated association status and is no longer administratively functional. It is sad and shame, but it is none the less true.

    In addition, I feel I am much better able to carry on the positive aspects of the Democrats’ values and legacy from within the Greens. And whilst it’s not why I joined, it also provides far more effective opportunities to ensure the Democrats’ many achievements are not forgotten and the positive aspects of the Democrats role over 30 years can by kept alive as the Greens move more fully into (and beyond) the space the Democrats once occupied – hopefully whilst also learning from and avoiding some of the mistakes the Democrats made (including some I participated in)

  3. Agreed.

    But why do they keep distracting progressive voters with the “rebuild” stuff?

    And is there a former Democrats refuge club in the Greens? If so, I would like to join….

  4. Kat

    There are certainly plenty of former Democrats in the Greens, including at least two other former Senators. The newly elected Upper House MP for the Greens in South Australia is a former Democrat Senate candidate too.

    But I wouldn’t call it a refuge though. The Greens, like any group of people, have a variety of views and there is a fair chance that that diversity is reflected amongst those Green members who used to be in the Democrats.

    There used to be ex-Greens in the Democrats too – may well still be a few. But the Democrats vs Greens spats diverted the attention of far too many people away from more important things in years gone by. I’d rather just focus on what’s possible here and now and how to get more acceptance and effective implementation of policies and values I believe in.

    It’s not really for me to comment on the “rebuild” calls being made by those who currently have control of the Democrats name – what they do is up to them, and I have no interest in criticising them. People are free to pursue different paths to promote policies or issues. I made my view clear enough at the relevant time that the Democrats would best be served by formally winding up, but for better or worse the party’s members nationally weren’t given the chance to vote to make that happen. My main interest nowadays in regards to the Democrats is to continue to remind people of the many good things that party and its members did over the just over 30 years it was represented in various Parliaments around Australia.

  5. I read the link for Make Poverty History, and while it has an admirable humanitarian flavour, I don’t think it should be relying on the new age Climate Change Religion.

    As a former Exit Counsellor with the Cult Awareness Network, I believe this carbon-based religion to be a myth created by huge corporations, to bring the whole world down to the lowest common denominator in terms of wages, housing and lifestyle using high levels of taxation and foreign debt.

    I sponsored starving children in Latin America for 18 years and have been involved in other charitable work to clothe children in the freezing back blocks of China and Europe, but I think I’ve been around for long enough now to realise that phenomenal greed and lust for power are frequently hidden behind altruistic, humanitarian or more sinister agendas.

  6. Andrew:

    Cutting greenhouse emissions in developed countries by 40% by 2020

    The de-industrialisation of the west.

    Who’ll help us if we actually achieved this.
    The now bankrupt US.

    China ?

  7. Tony

    I appreciate that you’re not convinced by the wide range of scientific which points towards the likelihood of rapid climate change due to increased carbon and other emissions.

    But to say that reducing greenhouse emissions by 40% will lead to the “de-industrialisation of the west” is just silly – it sounds like you’re channeling one of Nick Minchin’s more oddball beliefs suggesting climate change theories are some sort of glbal conspiracy to destroy capitalism.

    The technological and other means to make these sort of reductions is already available – the only issue is that in some cases it is more expensive than business as usual. It might cost a small percentage extra of our GDP – although far less than the cost of no action if you accept the climate change thesis – but using different, and most cases more modern, technology hardly counts as “de-industrialisation.”

  8. I think we all know that the west is being de-industrialised even without a Carbon Tax. There is a very clear tie-in with the empowerment and industrialisation of the third world, most notably China and India. For example, most of the clothing, car manufacturing and recycling industries have now gone off shore.

    For some years, charities who sell handcrafted items in large Australian shopping centres have found it more difficult to turn a profit due to the rise of $2.00 shops selling goods made for a song by Asian slaves.

    I am told a Chinese man owns all of the Westfield Shopping Centres. He will only allow charities in to sell their goods twice a year, and they now have to pay “shop rent” to use small open areas of the mall with severe size and space restrictions.

    The Climate Change Religion is being used to speed up the process of financially ruining the western nations, not so the money can go to the third world, but to further empower banks.

    The banking corporations are robbing the Australian people through every possible avenue and affiliated body so they can attain the 2 most sought after goals of a destructive doomsday cult – Money and Power.

    In the last year, we have seen much greater pressure to buy generic products, mostly made in Asia. This will have further disastrous effects on Australian businesses, and increase foreign debt.

    Anyone who has read the various Declarations and Agreements signed by Australian governments will know of the global plan to sell out the entire world to corporate communism via the establishment of Economic Unions.

    A couple of weeks ago, I went to the Breast Screening Clinic at Chermside. A number of women I spoke with there were well aware of the sellout and selloff of the Australian people and their assets by successive governments from the Left and the Right. The older the people were, the more astute they seemed to be.

  9. Andrew:

    Climate change has been occuring naturally over the centuries.
    I think to suggest that reducing all power and energy output by 40% is a silly statement.

    The unanswered question is whether man is causing any interference.
    Yes it seems in city areas there seems to be a slight warning occuring while in regional centres there is either none or even cooling occuring.

    I’m sure if you attend this forum with the idea of pushing the now tired and discredited theory that man is causing some castistrofic event by generating power or energy then I know who’ll be the one looking silly.

    There are many things we can achieve to help these countries. Reducing our ability to do so is not one of them.

  10. iv only one thing to say about the next election if you think its going to be won with climate control i think you have missed the boat !! againe andrew .

  11. Red Crab:

    I don’t think the next election will be won on climate change issues – it would nice if that was the case, but I don’t believe it will be.

    However, it is important for those who accept the majority of scientific evidence and opinion about the serious danger of climate change to have a genuine option to vote for.

    At the moment, those who believe climate change is no threat can vote for the Liberal National Party. However, those who believe the majority scientific opinion on climate change should be aware that the Labor Party’s policies for carbon reduction come nowhere near what the majority scientific opinion says is necessary. It is important that The Greens provide a credible choice for such people. If you don’t think climate change is an issue, feel free to vote for someone else.

    Tony:

    If you can provide a reference which shows that the view that rapid, major climate change will occur if there is not a rapid reduction in greenhouse emissions is “tired and discredited”, I’d be happy to read it.

    In any case, you still haven’t indicated how shifting our energy production from carbon intensive to renewable methods equals “de-industrialisation”

    Lorikeet:

    I don’t see how “empowerment and industrialisation of the third world” could possibly cause de-industrialisation of the developed world.

    Also, regardless of how evil we might think the banks to be, I would really like to understand how “financially ruining the western nations” could possibly “further empower banks.”

    My understanding is that banks tend to struggle rather a lot (as we’ve seen in the USA quite recently) if ‘western nations’ encounter major financial difficulties.

  12. Andrew:

    “…. those who think climate change is no threat can vote for the Liberal National Party.”

    I think that would be a very bad idea. For decades they have worked to the same global agenda as Labor, and are stroking the grass just a little at the moment to lure voters, before moving down a much harsher track.

    You don’t understand how empowerment and industrialisation of the third world can de-industrialise Australia???????????????

    I already said that a lot of our industries are moving offshore. Please read my last post again.

    You might remember Oxfam complaining about Pacific Brands making use of slave labour in Asia, thereby putting even more of our clothing industries on the shelf.

    The last of our white goods industries moved to Thailand not long ago, when Fisher & Paykel took the manufacture of their dish drawers there.

    You think the banks are struggling????? Over the decades, banks have progressively made higher profits from the advent of credit cards, along with banking fees, mortgages, business loans etc. They are also involved with superannuation and insurance.

    Have you looked at the many organisations some of the banks own and profit from? I suggest you start looking into the activities of the Macquarie Bank, just for starters.

    It would take me too long to fully explain how “financially ruining the western nations” could possibly “further empower banks”.

    People from big corporations are responsible for the terrible starvation we are currently seeing in Africa. Now they are trying to force white farmers out of South Africa, so we can have a repetition of what happened in Zimbabwe.

    Banks desire to completely control the world’s food supply, and are using the Climate Change agenda to break the developed nations (that’s governments and people, not banks) after they have deliberately caused civil and international conflicts, and removed access to food.

  13. I am tired of the thought of not voting again.That is,my life is a specific reality.Voting seems a irresponsible illogicality,my experiences disallows me to give it high value………..

  14. andrew
    do you really think anything will slow the enevitable rush to extinction that is fueled buy the lust for money and power .
    humans have had the abillity to have a neally carbon free world for over 100years but went the way off fossel fuels why it was not cheeper it was more expencive so why !! MONEY and POWER. the industrys that have evolved around the use of fossel fuels have got to a point of no return because if we went and swapped over the alternitives (that have been avalible for a long time ) most of the first world countrys would collaps into anachy.
    i think you missed the point about boats !! i ment that the next election will be won or lost over the population issue when the govt puts new arivals over the comunity that is! the country then they suffer the cosequenses.
    that brings us back to the point of pollution the more ppl the more pollution so how would the greens stand on that arnt the greens oppossed to out of control poulation growth? .

    as far as voting go,s i would more than likley vote for you if i was in your electrate because i think that you care unlike others who have agenders of there own that are possible not for the good of the whole community.
    the trick is thought only polititions that have strong opinions and are prepered to stick to them weather they are right or wrong to the bitter end will prevale

    My understanding is that banks tend to struggle rather a lot (as we’ve seen in the USA quite recently) if ‘western nations’ encounter major financial difficulties.

    you have got to be jokeing i hope !
    the global collaps was orcistrated buy the banks and financial instotutions because of greed and the nessesity to cut the superanuation that was owed the the ppl that were about to retire because there had stolen it and made bad investments

    but the sad thing is that no one has learnt anything from it .

  15. Lorikeet said:

    “You don’t understand how empowerment and industrialisation of the third world can de-industrialise Australia?”

    No I don’t. I don’t think Australia or Australians are so weak that we would somehow return to a de-industrialised state just because some other nations become better off. You seem to be arguing for keeping the third world dis-empowered and poor – which is not something I can agree with either ethically or pragmatically.

    In response to Peter Black’s question, the forum is free but the organisers are asking people to RSVP in advance.

    You can RSVP by Tuesday April 27 via the following:
    emails to annmatson@oxfam.org.au or calling 07 3637 4600

  16. Andrew:

    We could have used our own steel to build school libraries and assembly halls. The same applied to pink batts. If we keep importing things we don’t need from China and India, and there is little or no work for our own factories and workers, wouldn’t you consider that a form of de-industrialisation?

    My aunt worked all her life in clothing factories, only to see more and more of them closing down and the work going offshore, mostly to China. To me, that is de-industrialisation in action.

    I also had relatives who worked in the car manufacturing industry at Acacia Ridge, until most of the work left our shores, which also left them without jobs.

    I don’t think the third world should remain disempowered and poor. I think you should know me better than that by now. I just don’t want Australia to keep going backwards and racking up more and more foreign debt.

    As you would be aware, GATT, GATS, and LDPAID&C are all international agreements which have been signed by previous governments. They lock us into a worldwide redistribution of wealth, as per a Crush Australia Policy.

    Our citizens have no interest in being taxed to the eyeballs and having their wages held down with housing prices, rents and utilities completely sapping their resources.

  17. I can’t remember who said this, but it seems true.
    No modern nation has ever become great without manufacturing.

  18. Lorikeet

    I am glad you don’t think the third world should stay disempowered and poor.

    It was your comment that “the west is being de-industrialised …..there is a very clear tie-in with the empowerment and industrialisation of the third world” and your querying how I “don’t understand how empowerment and industrialisation of the third world can de-industrialise Australia” which gave me this assumption.

    Nicholas – I suspect one of the issues here is people having different ideas of what constitutes industrialisation and manufacturing. In regards to your quote, one thing it doesn’t address is whether a nation needs manufacturing to stay ‘great’, and if so what sort. Some of the most successful economies in western Europe in the last decade or two (including those that have coped with the GFC better than Iceland, Ireland, Greece, etc) have moved ahead more through knowledge and technology, rather than trying to prop up old style manufacturing. (of course either is better than trying to build an economy on the thin air of the financial sector)

  19. Andrew Says:
    Lorikeet
    I am glad you don’t think the third world should stay disempowered and poor

    I dont think she meant that. Pouring money into corrupt governments or raming the some global warming ideology down their throat is not the way to help. Teaching them to look after themselves by producing first for themselves and not the global markets is a good very first step.

    Educating engineers, health workers and the like in western countries where they are required to return to their country would not only help these countries but help us to lower educational costs here.

    Assist in the construction of dams etc in these countries using their own workers and teaching them to produce first for themselves and export their surpluses is a great way to help these countries pull out from the global system that is abusing their cheap labor and resources.

    Nicholas Wood
    I can’t remember who said this, but it seems true.
    No modern nation has ever become great without manufacturing

    Thats right a country is what a country makes.
    This country lacks the ability to feed cloth and arm its military internally. A very sorry and dangerous place to be for any nation.

    The first rule of economic is totally ignored in modern globalism that pushes for the very dangerous inter-dependency platform it pushes.

  20. From a recent television report, not enough money is being put into Research and Development in Australia.

  21. I’d be surprised Tony and Lorikeet if a close inspection of your wardrobes and homes didn’t reveal a plethora of goods manufactured off shore.

    The reason is very very simple, we worship the world of consumerism so we should hardly be surprised when the market delivers what consumers want, that is shirts, undies, etc at a fraction of the price of 30 years ago.

    While at uni I worked in the HMV factory at Homebush on the production line sticking little badges of a dog with a megaphone (remember them) into speakers, for me it was a means to an end, for most of the permanent people there, exclusively migrant women their livelihood. It’s long gone.

    It really is very simple, if someone can produce a product for $5 and you can only produce it for $15 then what will happen. you either close down or you make your product so differentiated on quality etc that people will be prepared to pay for it (the BMW Rolls Royce approach).

    Now we don’t like it because we have been at the top end of the food chain for a long time, but try telling the worker in China now earning triple what they did 5 years ago, still a pittance compared to here, that no you can’t make these shirts anymore because reactionaries in Australia want to go back to paying $60 for what they now buy in Big W for $15.

    This great world conspiracy theory you continually preach etc is simply consumerism working efficiently – whilst ever we continue to consume then capital will move to where it can be most cheaply utilised. Africa will be next, subject to settling down political unrest, and we will eventually return to the cheapest and will get our turn again.

    Alternatively, take a new development approach, this is the territory the greens talk about, but if only they weren’t so fixated or still associated with loopy fringe things (dope, gay whales, bring back Che and the like) scaring off the conservative middle and had leaders who weren’t so off mainstream they would have a chance.

  22. Ken Says: It really is very simple, if someone can produce a product for $5 and you can only produce it for $15 then what will happen. you either close down or you make your product so differentiated on quality etc that people will be prepared to pay for it

    In a world where all things are equal then that statement would be correct.
    All things are not equal. The rules and legislation placed on our manufacturers is a great part of the cost that makes them less competitive.
    Then we import from countries that dont hold any of those rules or safety measures.

    We import 70% of our seaford from overseas yet Australia has the most underfished waters in the world. The countries that we import from have the worst environmental record of any of the nations.
    We put unnecessary rules regulations and limits to make our fisherman uncompetitive and then reward the countries that are destroying our environment.

    In the past the quality of goods like clothing etc manufactured in Australia lasted a lot longer and kept the populations waste down to a miniumum.
    Now we import cheap look a likes that are adding an every increasing demand on on our local councils for waste facilities.

    Cheap imports continue to increase our foreign debt and balance of trade figures, while we remove all protection on industry inc Agricluture that most other nations dont.

    Skills and jobs are lost and foreign debt continues to rise.

    Ken says: This great world conspiracy theory you continually preach etc is simply consumerism working efficiently
    Working efficiently. I dont think, so.

    As I said if a nation can’t arm, cloth and feed its military then you have a real problem. Australia is heading down that path rapidly.

    In fact in a few short years we will be a net importer of food.

    You may think thats great for our country….. But I dont.
    Fair trade…. not free trade is the answer.

  23. i haven’t made a valyue judgement one way or the oher Tony – don’t try to ascribe that to me (not for the first time I might add).

    i am simply saying what is – and of course capital will move to countries where no laws exist – that is exactly the point.

    What is Fair trade – fair trade to whom – fair trade to some is exclude the fuzzy wuzzy’s and make suer they stay poverty stricken and we can be happy feeding and arming ourselevs.

    One man’s fairness is almost alwasy anoethrs injustice.

  24. Guys:

    We must also consider some of the unpatriotic manufacturers who take their business to Asia, make use of slaves, and then flog the goods back here in Australia at enormous prices.

    For example, a dress selling for $100 in a clothing boutique has been Made in China. You can bet the worker who made it got less than $2.00.

    I agree with Tony. I don’t think Ken knows very much about economics, trade or any other element of the Crush Australia Policy.

    If it were up to me, I would bring back compulsory unionism. That would fix any inter-racial ill feeling currently held against visa holders and give everyone greater and equal protection in the work place.

    If we are expected to give $17 billion to the third world every year, I know where it should come from.

    Let us slap a new kind of Income and Assets Test onto big banks, and then use it to determine how much of the $17 billion THEY have to pay. There would need to be legislation in place to prevent them from shunting their profits into their many other interests outside of the banking world.

    That should keep Oxfam and nearly everyone else happy.

  25. Ken says: I’d be surprised Tony and Lorikeet if a close inspection of your wardrobes and homes didn’t reveal a plethora of goods manufactured off shore.

    Actually I have many Aussie made workboots and shoes.
    Jumpers I have when we could buy Australia made are still in good shape and will probably out live me, but I cant seem to buy them anymore.
    So we dont have much choice. I’d imagine its hard competiting with cheap labour from these unregulated areas that exploit cheap labour.

    Ken Says: What is Fair trade – fair trade to whom – fair trade to some is exclude the fuzzy wuzzy’s and make suer they stay poverty stricken and we can be happy feeding and arming ourselevs

    Well lets see. China has 70% tariff on our goods we have none on theirs. Great for China …lousy for us.
    Brazel has 48% tariffs on their sugar …..Our blokes…….Nothing.
    The US and EU have now placed back a tariff on dairy products. (16%)
    Our farmers get……thats right zip…….nothing.

    Both the majors constantly call for a level playing field.
    Why dont they practice what they preach.

    Reciprocal free trade might just be a good place to start Ken.

    I have no problem with countries protecting their interest and their independence but protected goods should not be imported to the detriment of our produceers. A similar penalty should apply to at least
    pretend this country has a fair trade system.

    If we continue down this road we will be a net importer of food and manufactured goods and will most likely be the next Nauru of the Pacific.

  26. Tony:

    I think we are already exporting a lot of food, but certainly not on a level playing field.

    I saw an item on TV that said when we helped Thailand learn to grow sugar, we could no longer sell our own.

    The major parties want a level playing field, but it isn’t the one that most Australians would want, or the one that you are thinking of either.

    They have agreed to a worldwide redistribution of wealth (also supported by Green ideology). Kicking your own people in the guts is part of the plan.

    For example, in order to have a worldwide level playing field, they are empowering banks and third world economies to even out the humps. No, this doesn’t mean that you will get less sex. It means that Australia will continue to be treated as a good place to dig gold until all countries are reduced to the lowest common denominator. Then banks will rule us with an iron fist and low income.

    Ken:

    I sometimes buy things from the Oxfam shop in Brisbane CBD to give to my grandchildren as gifts.

    Probably nearly everything in my cupboard comes from Asian countries. This is because hardly anything is made here any more.

    I would be quite happy to pay a bit more for clothes that don’t fade after just one cold water washing, and look second hand after only one season. Even the manufacture of work clothes and boots has moved to Asia. When I tried to buy a pair of leather gloves, even my little hands would not fit in.

    Cheap Asian electronic goods don’t last very long, and because they are cheap, they are not worth repairing. So they go into the bin and into the landfill with monotonous regularity.

    I am also starting to become very angry with these Climart Smart people. They are constantly on my back to toss both the deep freezer and a perfectly good washing machine onto the dump.

    We live in a country which is far flung from the rest of the world. We are already disadvantaged in trade, without anyone wanting to keep pushing the Crush Australia Policy.

  27. tony i just looked into my wardrobe and hanging there is a jaket i bourght in vic in 1971 bacause i was cold . its still good and it was made in australia . no other cloths made elcewhere have survived.

    they are prob oil rags taking up land fill and polluting the ground water now

  28. I had an email from Ann Matson today. She said the “Make Poverty History” forum has been postponed until some time in June.

  29. Last night I saw an interesting report from China. Their ship building dockyards churn out another ship every 2 days, mostly for the purpose of collecting iron ore from other countries, converting it to steel, and then exporting it again.

    The Chinese people benefit very little from GDP, because nearly everything they make is exported.

    Now developers are building whole suburbs of high rise apartments in Shanghai, which they hope to eventually fill as the people become more financially empowered.

    A Chinese spokesmen said their agenda to export nearly everything produced will come to an end eventually. The rest I missed due to the telephone ringing.

    The forum “Make Poverty History” has been re-scheduled for Tuesday, 8 June 2010 at the same venue and time.

Comments are closed.