Following what your politicians do

Another welcome development in the task of making it easier for the public scrutinise the work of their parliamentarians, with the launch of the Project Democracy website by the folks at GetUp!  The Project Democracy site taps into the Open Australia site which I wrote about in this post. Jason Wilson, who previously worked at QUT…

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Political blogging in the UK

I’ve mused a number of times about the potential impacts of blogging on politics and politicians, and the differences between various countries. One longstanding blogging politician is Peter Black, a Liberal Democrat member of the Welsh Assembly, who has been at it for over five years. He has written an interesting piece on the impacts of blogging…

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Some electoral stats

Some interesting statistics in the latest issue of The Tally Board from the Australian Electoral Commission which show how important the internet has become for basic information about elections. During the 2007 federal election, there were more than 3.2 million visitors to the AEC website and over 14.4 million page views. This compares to over 800…

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Participation vs punditry

I participated in a panel of speakers at the Microsoft Forum on Politics & Technology earlier this week, along with Antony Green, Joe Hockey, Kate Lundy and Matt Bai. It was an interesting discussion, although I did get a bit irritated that the debate seemed to keep turning inwards into a discussion about how politicians…

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Open democracy II

The potential of the Open Australia site that I linked to in this post has clearly raised the hopes and interest of a range of bloggers (like Peter Martin, The Podcast Network, Public Polity and LP). Kim at LP notes the site is based on a similar site in the UK.  Another good example of an independent effort to open up access to the…

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Opening up access to Parliament

A website with great potential for opening up the happenings in Parliament has gone online.  The Open Democracy site is just in the beta/testing stage, but it has the potential to serve a really valuable role.  You can sign up to get an email alert every time your local MP speaks in Parliament, or every…

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2020 Summit

There was plenty of cynicism voiced by many people about the 2020 Summit held in Canberra this weekend.  I can understand why some might tend to feel that way, but I think there is less reason to feel cynical about it than the average Parliamentary sittings which provide the usual political activity in Canberra. I believe…

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Do we really need 4 year terms?

Writing in the Courier-Mail last week, Griffith University academic Paul Williams strongly put the case for Queensland to move to four year terms for our state Parliament (and in effect for our state government as well). I used to also be in favour of shifting to four year, fixed terms at state level as well as…

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Taiwan elections and UN representation

This year’s Presidential election in the USA is getting an enormous amount of coverage in Australia, but there’s an election a bit closer to home happening tomorrow in Taiwan (sometimes called the Republic of China). Its implications won’t be anywhere near as big for Australia or the globe compared to what happens in the USA,…

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