6 years of blogging

It’s been such a long time since I started this blog, and both I and the blog have been through so many transitions I’d forgotten what time of year it was that I started it. So it was a complete coincidence that I thought I might look to see when the first entry was, and […]

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Formal Declaration of Queensland Senate poll

The Senate count for Queensland was formally declared today. The actual distribution of final preferences occurred yesterday; today was the formal announcement by the Electoral Commission, which also provides opportunities for candidates to speak.  There are a few aspects of the count and result which I will write about in a separate post. All six […]

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A narrowing for Queensland

I’ll wait until the Senate results are officially finalised before commenting more fully on what the ramifications might be. There are a lot of votes still to be counted, and I think there is a reasonable chance in Victoria that the Greens will catch up with the Liberals to take the final Senate seat there […]

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Acknowledgement

Election days always start early and finish late, especially if you’re a candidate. Visiting lots of booths and talking to campaign helpers throughout the day, followed by gathering together at night to watch the results come in and thanking people collectively for all their hard work. When it’s a bad result for people, it can […]

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The Big Question

There’s only one more full day left before polling day, so I’ve decided it’s time to answer the really big question on the minds of voters.  I’ve been to over a hundred forums, functions, events, meetings and activities over the last six weeks, and there have been three questions I’ve been asked far more frequently […]

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Days 37 & 38

Yesterday and today are a mixture of media seeking, policy releases and voter meeting. I released some policies on child protection, which managed to achieve a small amount of media interest. Then I headed up to the Sunshine Coast

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Libs not even showing up online!

This election has seen wider efforts at using the internet to provide a broader range of information to the electorate beyond the narrow confines of what is served up by the mainstream media. Two in particular are You Decide 2007, which is endeavouring to provide ‘citizen-journalist’ style coverage at the electorate level, and How Should […]

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Where’s the Immigration debate?

Yesterday I spoke at a session of the Queensland Multicultural Summit. There were about 250 or so people in attendance. The keynote speaker on the first day was Philippe Legrain, the British author of “Immigrants: Your country needs them.”  He has a blog of his own if you want to get a better idea of […]

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Covering elections

Further to my post from the previous weekend, featuring Michael Gawenda (and me) bemoaning the nature of election campaigns and coverage, Margaret Simons has some suggestions in today’s Crikey on “what might be some more useful ways of covering an election campaign”.

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Poll favours Democrats for Senate

It might not seem like much, but when there’s been three years of media coverage consisting mostly of pre-emptive obituary stories, seeing a headline that says “Poll favours Democrats for Senate” in the Sunday paper – albeit above a small story on page 9 – can come as rather a surprise. Even though it was […]

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Koala Protection

I launched the Queensland Democrats Environmental Sustainability platform with the Australian Koala Foundation‘s Deborah Tabart, last week. It’s clear that state and local government have not been able to get their act together enough to prevent excessive clearing of koala habitat – resorting to the tried and true method of blaming each other for the […]

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Labor Party Campaign Launch

According to the word count on my computer program, Kevin Rudd’s speech at the Labor Party’s campaign launch today contained four thousand, three hundred and fifteen words – slightly fewer than the four thousand four hundred and four words in the corresponding speech by the Prime Minster two days earlier. The only specific reference in Mr Rudd’s speech to […]

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