Bartlett's Blog

Andrew Bartlett has been active in politics for over 20 years, including as a Queensland Senator from 1997-2008. This blog started in 2004 and reflects his own views, independent of any political party or organisation.

Where to next with climate change battle?

Earlier this week, I spoke with Kellie Caught, head of climate change campaigning with WWF in Australia, about the outcomes of the conference in Durban, as well as what comes next following the package of Clean Energy and carbon pricing legislation that was passed by the Australian Parliament last month.   You can listen to that interview at this link.

The legislative package passed with the support of Labor MPs, plus Independents and the Greens is a major advance, but it’s certainly not the end of all that needs to be done to reduce greenhouse emissions at the level and rate that the vast majority of scientific opinion believes is needed.

There has just been yet another international conference about climate change issues occur in Durban in South Africa. I’ve seen varying views about how good or bad the outcome of that Conference is for the battle to prevent runaway climate changes – these pieces from New Matilda and Climate Spectator are worth reading.

There is much more that needs to be done, but it’s good to finally have some significant legislative and policy movement forward in Australia after so many years of inaction at government level.

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19 Comments, Comment or Ping

  1. TerjeP

    The next step must surely be to decriminalise nuclear power in Australia.

  2. Lorikeet

    I don’t believe in the Climate Change religion at all. It’s only about greedy bankers taking off with our money while even more Australians end up living on the streets due to very high cost of living and job losses.

    This of course will also enable bankers to take over the housing market, after a huge welfare bill causes pensioners to live off reverse mortgages on their homes.

    I believe bankers already have their greedy little eyes on Health, Education and The Arts. As foreshadowed in the media, Queensland Health is about to be split in two. It will be interesting to see what happens in the near future.

    As for Nuclear Energy, I am unlikely to quickly forget the holocaust which occurred in Japan, for which the death toll and degree of human suffering will not be fully calculated for decades.

    The use of Nuclear Energy is more damaging to human kind in terms of weapons and power production than anything the planet can dish up.

    If the entire world is to be dotted with power plants using Nuclear Fusion or Fission, I feel certain it won’t be long before large chunks are being blown off Planet Earth on a regular basis. This is to say nothing of health effects and damage to crops and water supply.

  3. Lorikeet

    For those who aren’t aware, greedy bankers are already in the process of taking over Aged Care. The Productivity Commission has recommended reverse mortgages on homes, so the Slave Labor Party’s banking mates can rob the most frail and elderly people blind.

    At the same time, there is no recommendation to return any of the substantial proceeds to underpaid workers in terms of pay increases.

    I believe Kevin Rudd’s Slave Labor Trade in aged care will continue to exploit foreign workers, while withholding citizenship, so they cannot move onto another country where the pay is better.

    In doing this the Slave Labor Party will continue to damage the Age Pyramid instead of supporting it. Workers will continue to return to their countries of origin in disgust, after being ripped off in our universities and housing market, and being treated in a racist, second class fashion by corporate managers.

  4. appy

    Lorikeet, what does the Decrepit Leftover Party say about Aged Care?

  5. David H.

    It would, methinks, be helpful if we – in Australia – disconnect thinking and philosophy (political or otherwise) from the “northern hemisphere”.

    The island continent Australia has – in the brief history of European occupation – suffered greatly.

    Am not so silly as to expect northern hemisphere attitudes to change next week, next year … but it might be nice to see Australian attitudes drift from north to south .. sometime in the next century (will it be too late? Only time will tell).

  6. David H.

    * oops – south to north.

  7. Lorikeet

    Appy:

    To my knowledge, the ALP is about to become a decrepit leftover party after its voter base has splintered in every direction. I have already given details of their attitude to Aged Care.

    On ABC TV recently, they also seemed to be trying to refute claims that the Guest Worker program on the land was not another Slave Labor Trade involving people from the Pacific Islands, but when the ALP and Liberals bring in foreign workers instead of increasing wages, the net effect is the same.

    I don’t care who they bring, as long as everyone working on the land receives the “living wage” often talked about, but seldom delivered. Farmers would also be able to pay better wages if large supermarket corporations weren’t dudding farmers, workers and customers.

    If you wish to learn about the Democratic Labor Party’s attitude to Aged Care, you have come to one of the right people. I have been working with the National Seniors of Australia and the Australian Nursing Federation to get a better deal for Aged Care recipients and their carers for some years.

    The DLP policy would have quotas on every staffing category and specific funding allocations for various purposes, to prevent service providers from ripping off both residents and workers.

    I recently attended an NSA Aged Care Forum here in Brisbane and lots of excellent ideas were put forward. Reverse mortgages on homes (where one partner is still living in it) and uncapped bonds seemed to be rejected out of hand, as they were quite rightly considered deliberate attempts to rob the elderly.

    The DLP would like to see Aged Care moved back out of the corporate sector, because we don’t believe that shareholders should be able to profit from other people’s illness and infirmity.

    I think we also need to find ways of reducing paperwork and red tape, as administration costs are much too high and reduce the amount of time that nurses can spend looking after the elderly and disabled.

    I would also like to see further investigation of Integrated Aged Care, which was suggested by someone at the forum. I recently sent an email to the NSA with a list of relevant comments for consideration.

  8. Lorikeet

    David H:

    I see no reason for any Australian to want to work in with those in the northern hemisphere, who don’t seem to be able to get anything right across a broad spectrum of issues.

    Although our foreign debt is much too high, I disagree with your comment that Australia has “suffered greatly” in the past.

    I think Australia has been a very prosperous nation, but in the last 35 years, we have been sent slowly backwards by various global agendas pandered to by both Liberals and (to a much greater extent) Labor.

    Foodbanks are now feeding100,000 people each week in SE Qld alone. This is an excellent indicator of a backsliding economy.

    Large numbers of both public and private homes are being left empty, while the number of homeless people increases apace. We are also beginning to see signs of the government’s interest in corporatising Health/Hospitals and the Housing Market. I believe Education and The Arts will quickly follow.

    Every time I hear terminology such as MiHealth, MySchool, MySuper, MyWoolies etc being used, I know we are in the process of being overrun and controlled by money hungry corporates, and also held responsible for their many and varied financial abuses.

  9. red crab

    looked at an interesting site called ted
    maybe the supporters of the carbon TAX should look at it shoots there claim that carbon is a problem to pieces and proves that the govts and greens carbon tax is a sham .

  10. appy

    red crab – whic of the many conversatons on TED are you talking about? There are lots of pointsof view there.

  11. Lorikeet

    http://www.ted.com/talks/david_keith_s_surprising_ideas_on_climate_change.html

    This fellow has some fairly hair raising suggestions.

    First he briefly mentions the prospect of melting sea water in the northern hemisphere causing global sea levels to rise. As we all know, when ice melts, its volume becomes smaller. This would cause sea levels to fall.

    He says we haven’t done anything about rising temperatures after 50 years of talking. I guess he has forgotten that our energy costs have skyrocketed, despite little or no infrastructure spending on less polluting energy production options.

    He also expresses an interest in creating his own Global Winter (Ice Age) to control the Earth’s temperature. This would create the very catastrophic outcomes that scientists say they are trying to avoid … large scale death of trees, animals, human beings.

    He also has an interest in levitating existing particles from the ionosphere into the mesosphere to limit their impact on the Earth’s climate, especially over the poles, where civilisation would be minimally impacted.

    I think scientists are likely to create worse catastrophes than any God or Mother Nature could dish up.

    I consider that anyone who thinks they can control either the weather or the climate is possessed by an exceedingly narcissistic arrogance and over-confidence in their own God-like abilities.

    This is highly reminiscent of some of the world’s most destructive cult leaders.

  12. Colin

    I just still can’t believe that there are climate change deniers. It is pretty simple science. Green house gasses trap heat, we have emmitted allot more green house gasses (like 300ppm to 480ppm), so hence the physics tell us that we are trapping heat which is disturbing our atmosphere. What people don’t get is that rather then have a nice simplistic relationship with heat and atmosphere, we have a complex one.

    But for those that like Simplistic ideas, here is how David Beckham caused climate change http://theconversation.edu.au/how-david-beckham-caused-global-warming-the-man-u-climate-model-4548

  13. red crab

    and you really think that population growth in the world is not the problem
    the reality is that humans will continue to populate until they destroy the planet .
    this planet has been warming and cooling for millions of years .sometimes with outside influences and sometimes buy its self .
    humans have bean here for less than a blink of an eye .
    we would be stupid to think that modern man will last forever
    the Americans have developed a flue strain that if it was to escape could kill 60% of the earth’s population .

    there is a 28 year old in control of a unstable nuclear state
    war in the middle east is edging closer every day .

    global warming is a fact no amount of taxes will change that fact
    global warming debate is just another case of Govt. trying to gain more money and power.

    there are only two things that humans can do

    stop breeding to much and adapt !

    happy new year and good luck for next year.

  14. Lorikeet

    Red Crab:

    If you look into Age Pyramids, you will quickly realise that before 2050 many nations’ populations will have already begun to crash with an enormous thud.

    In the western nations, we have had access to birth control pills for 50 years, and when those born after 1960 have departed this mortal coil, the population will be a lot lower. For decades we have had a birth rate well below Zero Population Growth, which is a socially dangerous state of affairs. We have only reached ZPG very recently, after years of having a Baby Bonus in place.

    The Chinese government has had a One Child Policy for 30+ years.

    As you know, sensible people are certainly NOT denying that the climate is changing. We are simply not so arrogant as to imagine that mankind can fully understand either the weather or the climate, let alone change it.

    We older folk are also quicker to realise that the Carbon Tax is just the latest fundraising scheme for greedy bankers, since we have been around a long time and witnessed many attempts to swindle the masses.

    This interesting link shows that the Chinese population is going into reverse at a rapid pace. By 2050, the number of births will have dropped to a level lower than 1950.

    http://www.china-profile.com/data/ani_pop_1.htm

    Take a look at the difference between the Age Pyramids of India and France at this link:

    http://www.google.com.au/search?q=age+pyramid+china+2050&hl=en&client=firefox-a&hs=Uvr&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=n139TpaCJOqyiQfR6pyhAQ&ved=0CDkQsAQ&biw=1366&bih=629

  15. Lorikeet

    Here is the current Age Pyramid for Australia. While there are projections made as to population increases from approx. 2000 to 2100, there are far too many possible variables for us to view them as socially sacrosanct.

    http://www.abs.gov.au/websitedbs/d3310114.nsf/home/Population%20Pyramid%20-%20Australia

    The Mayan Indians, along with various other cultures throughout history, have predicted a major catastrophe somewhere between 21-23 December 2012. This could involve Earth Crust Displacement of mammoth. I’m wondering what the “Profits” of Doom intend to do about that?

  16. red crab

    ok if what you are saying is correct lorikeet explain how the population of this planet has managed to reach 9 billion or so .
    some ones not using birth control.

  17. Lorikeet

    Red Crab:

    The figure of 9 billion world population is the prediction for 2050, with 8 billion predicted by 2030. In 2010, it was less than 7 billion.

    If you look at the link which shows Age Pyramids for France and India, you will see that contraception has been excessively used in France (developed nation) where access to medical care and nutrition is good; and used very little in India (third world nation).

    The third world cannot afford to use contraception due to the cost, and because their kids keep dying from malnutrition and disease. When I sponsored a 2 year old boy in Latin America, his parents had already lost 4 out of 6 of their children.

    A healthy Age Pyramid has a little pointy apex/top (comprising a small percentage of elderly people), with a natural progressive increase to a very broad based bottom. This ensures there are plenty of workers to support the older generations.

  18. Appy

    The Mayans (not Indians) did not predict the end of the world, even if we thought they were better than we are at seeing the future, at which humans are notoriously inept. The Mayan calandar consists of cycles. One ended eons ago, and one ends in 2012. I am quite happy to contemplate buying a subscription for something that runs out in 2014, because the odds are that we will still be here, bickering about proof about the effectiveness of being careful about pollution, water use and equitable policies of government toward all citizens, and those we have responsibilities for, bioth legal and moral.

    May you all enjoy a peaceful New Year, I’m off overseas again to make some money, will be back from time to time perhaps. Unless the Mayans were right.

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