Campaigning stories

A couple of stories from the campaign from Democrat volunteers (a nice one and a bad one, just to balance things):

1. While I was handing out the HTV cards a man with a thick accent came through and made sure he got a HTV card from every party and continued on inside to vote. After he voted he came and stood in front of all the people handing out HTV cards while the person he was with video taped him chatting in Spanish to camera. Once he was finished he explained to us that he was from Cuba and this was his first chance to vote and he was making a movie to send home to his relatives. He was so happy that he shook all of our hands and left with a grin from ear to ear.

2. My 75 year old mother was helping me letterbox a suburb a long way from where she lived. She got lost and after wandering around for an hour, came upon some people from another party letterboxing. She explained the situation and asked to use their mobile to call me and they refused!

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6 Comments

  1. Stories like number one are the reason I get so angry when people either don’t pay any attention to politics or they simply think voting is a waste of time, it is people like these that make you wonder why parties like Family First get elected.

  2. A group of assholes, them.
    I worked a polling place in Toowoomba on Saturday, and was pleasantly surprised at how civil the tone was. HTV distributors were all very cordial, and a few of us (from different parties, that is) went out to the pub afterwards.
    I only had one unpleasant interaction. Toowoomba (Groom) is a safe Liberal seat, and incumbents have a tendency for cockiness (and condescension).
    Even that was mild, though, compared with the climate I’m used to in the ‘States, though. I’m surprised people here in Australia did that to your mother, but it wouldn’t seem so unusual in America.
    Hope she’s doing alright.

  3. That was my mother. She is ok, thanks Shem. But she’s still waiting for an apology from Tanya Plibersek.

  4. I sometimes wonder whether it’s not a sign of an efficient government that people don’t care who wins. Obviously the system must be self-managing if people can’t even bring themselves to complain once every 3-4 years…
    Sorry to hear about your mother! I think we need to make being an asshole a crime…

  5. “I sometimes wonder whether it’s not a sign of an efficient government that people don’t care who wins. Obviously the system must be self-managing if people can’t even bring themselves to complain once every 3-4 years…”
    It’s a sign of the increasing homogenization of the major parties. If there is no choice, if both are percieved as lying bastards with roughly the same policies, why bother voting?
    Its also a sign that the major parties are successfully maintaining their monopoly on electability, they have people convinced that only they can win.
    Again, with a choice between dumb and dumber, why vote?
    Its interesting to note that nearly 17% of Australians were undecided in the week before the poll.

  6. It’s also a sign that if elections can be best won with scare campaigns, the fatter the chequebook the better the campaign. The whole point of such campaigns is to neutralise the policy innovations of the other side(s) and replace genuine debate of issues with comparisons of personality.

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